Junghans Watch 1972 Chronoscope Review


With the Olympics closing ceremony ending in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday evening, we can only but reflect on the dedication, commitment and determination of the athletes competing in the worldwide event. Come on, who wasn't jumping for joy as Laura Trott cycled to glory! An inspirational, sporting games that brings the competitive spirit to the forefront every four years to win the ultimate prize - a gold medal. Junghans watches knows only too well of the importance of the Olympic Games with their special historical link. 


Back in 1972, Junghans was the official timekeeper of the Munich Olympic Games. With their advanced technology, the luxury watch brand set ground breaking benchmarks with the recording of Olympic times; a proud part of their heritage in relation to the sporting world. Junghans introduced technology that exposed false starts and calculated precise running times for each individual athlete; a first for the Olympic sporting world bringing a new era of timekeeping to the competition. 


Junghans Watch 1972 Chronoscope


The Junghans ‘1972’ range brings the spirit of that particular Olympic summer with a sense of nostalgia and fondness of those spectacular moments. The responsibility of timing in different disciplines was met with innovative thinking and skilled design as is the 1972 Chronoscope. The retro design is a tribute to the success of the 1972 games with a clear rim, low-profile case and bold, striking use of contrasting colours. 


The models host either an electronic quartz movement or a solar version, which of course sources energy from the sun. For exact precision, the chronograph’s stopwatch function allows for the wearer to record times to exactly one fifth of a second; extremely useful for professional athletes or those in training. 


The Junghans 1972 Chronoscope is a sports watch dedicated to an era where technology evolved enhancing the athletic event and competitive nature of the sport considerably. The watch is designed for those cheering on Jason Keeny as he sprints for the finish line or watching tensely as Jack Laugher and Chris Mears dives impeccably for gold.