Bremont Watches Sea Clock Review

 

We’re all familiar with Bremont for their aviation pieces, but the British manufacturer has applied its expertise to sea clocks now as well. The company’s decided to honour the great John Harrison, whose Ship Chronometer solved one of the greatest chronological problems ever. His marine chronometer allowed mariners to precisely determine longitude while at sea. It proved to be revolutionary, and it helped the British to augment and extend their dominance at sea. The country, especially Parliament, was so desperate for a solution that they offered a prize of £20,000. 

Today, the interest is much more aesthetic. Seafaring vessels don’t really use sails anymore, and rely upon GPS and radar to help find their way. But there is a speciality market for quality devices, created by high-net worth individuals and their affinity for all things classic. Indeed, the private yachts and sailing ships of today could all benefit from adopting sea clocks of old.
Bremont is taking such care to emulate Harrison’s successes that the pace of production will proceed at a very slow rate. Only 10 to 15 clocks can be produced on an annual basis. The clocks will come complete with a 30 day power reserve, track three time zones, and feature a 90 day chronograph. 

Yet the owners and designers at Bremont aimed to do something else when they took up this challenge. They were sick and tired of seeing owners with fine timepieces on their wrists settling for quartz sea clocks on their vessels. Bremont recognised the need for sea clocks of a commensurate quality. 
It’s fitting that an English company would be the one reviving a tradition that began with an exceptional English inventor. The clocks will be available for delivery starting in January 2011, and will come with a price tag around £38,000 each. Ironically, it’s a price in nominal terms that’s greater than what Mr. Harrison was awarded for his device.